Creative Entrepreneurship

Archive for the ‘Get to Know’ Category

Jessica Goodenbury

Rochester Artisans 10 Questions Interview

1. What is your name and what is your business name? Where can we find you through social media?
I’m Jessica Goodenbury and I go by Puccoon Raccoon. You can find me on Facebook and Instagram if you want to see what I’ve been up to.

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
When I look back at my life I feel like everything I’ve done has been leading me directly towards where I am now. Art has been my hobby and passion since I could hold a crayon, and I realized I might be able to make a career out of it in High School. I went to college to become an art teacher (I love teaching) but took a random job as a jeweler for fun one summer two years in. Right away I was smitten and actually dropped out of college to keep my job. I ended up working as a bench jeweler for 9 years learning everything I could until two years ago when my department was dissolved and I was laid off. I took this perfect opportunity that I was given, launched my own business, and never looked back.

BigBanner-1

3. Explain a bit about your process, please.
Sculpture was my passion and my biggest artistic strength, so I make my jewelry by drawing off of that. My process is mostly done through lost wax casting, where I sculpt and carve things like my tiny animals then cast them into miniature silver beasts. I mix in some hand fabrication here and there, but I really enjoy working with wax primarily.

me in work space

4. What’s the comment heard most about your art?
“So you really make all these? How the heck do you work so small?”

5. What is one thing people find surprising about how your art is created?
That I hand sculpt the creatures in wax. Most people have no idea how jewelry is made and have a hard time wrapping their heads around the casting process.

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
If I had to pick just one of the tools that I love dearly, it would have to be my flex shaft. It’s a dremel tool that I use every single day and I can’t imagine working without.

7. How has your art changed over time?
I’m always trying to make my work better, but lately I’ve been trying to make my pieces more dynamic with more life in them. I know I can make some really awesome pieces, and I’m trying to explore and push my self to do what I have in me.

8. What’s your favorite part about making your pieces? Least favorite?
I love stone setting and sculpting my animals. I wish I could do that all day. What I don’t like is cleaning up my pieces after casting. It’s tedious, dirty, and repetitive, but essential.

9. What’s your dream project?
I’m not sure if this is my dream project or more of a nightmare, but I might have an opportunity in the future to make the jewelry for a movie. It’s a long story, but I know a guy who knows a guy and my name got out there. The idea of it terrifies me, but that would be so incredible to see pieces that I made in a movie.

10. Where is your art available for purchase?
I sell my pieces on my Etsy shop, and you’ll find me at local art shows all year all over town. 😀

Clouds

Kathy Cottrell

Rochester Artisans 10 Questions Interview

1. What is your name and what is your business name? Where can we find you through social media?
Kathy Cottrell dba Kat’s Kustom KarryAlls

Blog: Aprons with Attitude
Email: katskarryalls2@aol.com or apronswithattitude2@aol.com

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I began actively about 11 years ago and haven’t stopped.

3. Explain a bit about your process, please.
I look at a piece of fabric, fondle it and, taking into account the size of the piece, devise a mental picture of how it would look as a tote bag or clutch, walker tote, small purse, or apron. If the price is right and I have all the extras on hand [purse handles, zippers, coordinating fabric for lining etc,] I purchase it. Then I make it. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. If it works, I sell it. If it doesn’t, I remake it into something else. Nothing goes to waste in my sewing room.

4. What’s the comment heard most about your art? Vest Series #1 470
The lively colors and prints. The uniqueness of what the piece was in a former life [like it was a woman’s vest, now it’s a tote].

5. What is one thing people find surprising about how your art is created?
That I like to reuse items and make them into something entirely different [ie a man’s dress shirt into a stuffed animal].

Andy Bear 470

 

 

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
My Brother lightweight industrial sewing machine. This puppy will sew through bone.

7. How has your art changed over time?
I’ve gotten neater and cleaner, taking more time and care. Oh—I follow directions on the patterns.

8. What’s your favorite part about making your pieces? Least favorite?
Favorite: Creating it. Least: Not enough hours in the day.

9. What’s your dream project?
Making a quilted gym bag. The big ones. Something you could pack an entire set of clothes and sundries needed for a weekend away.

10. Where is your art available for purchase?
On my blog, Aprons With Attitude [cash, credit, personal checks] and at shows around town.

My grandkids and me at Niagara Falls Aquarium.

My grandkids and me at Niagara Falls Aquarium.

Artistry by Lisa Marie

Rochester Artisans 10 Questions Interview

1. What is your name and what is your business name? Where can we find you through social media? LisaMarie_WorkingInStudio
I am Lisa Marie, owner of the studio “Artistry By Lisa Marie.” You can also find me on Facebook (ArtistryByLisaMarie) and Instagram (ArtistryByLisaMarie).

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I was born with a crayon in my hand and was always drawing as a child. While working on my MA in Art History in Florence Italy, I realized I preferred creating art over studying art made by others. After I returned to the states I opened my studio, that was five years ago.

3. Explain a bit about your process, please.
My process depends on what I am creating. If it’s a custom pencil portrait based on a photo, I carefully study facial proportions – similar to the drawing techniques I learned from the Renaissance Masters that I studied in Italy. I slowly layer shadows and color to create a realistic portrait. If I am working on a coloring page – I always draw them by hand then upload them onto the computer to create digital files customers can buy online.

ShepMix_Portrait

4. What’s the comment heard most about your art?
Most comments are actually questions – can I blend two photos into one drawing? Can I take a small photo and turn it into a big commission? Can I enhance/takeaway a feature? The answer is almost always “YES”!

5. What is one thing people find surprising about how your art is created?
Many people seem surprised that my work is colored pencil. They see the rich colors and assume it’s paint.

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
My eraser. Love. Love. Love my eraser.

7. How has your art changed over time?
I have become more precise in custom portraits – definitely more technically accurate proportions. But I’ve also learned it’s OK to have fun with other features – such as hair, clothing, and tweaking eyes to bring them to life.

8. What’s your favorite part about making your pieces? Least favorite?
I love the feeling that I’m helping people cherish someone special with a portrait. With my coloring pages, my favorite part is when customers send me photos of their finished artwork. Least favorite is the same for both – there’s never enough time! I always think there’s just “one more thing” to do.

9. What’s your dream project?
I’m already doing it. Every commission and coloring page is a unique challenge that inspires me to draw something different – and that’s exactly what I want with each project in my studio.

10. Where is your art available for purchase?

You can find my etsy shop at ArtistryByLisaMarie.etsy.com, my blog is ArtistryByLisaMarie.wordpress.com. and I also list pricing info there.

Blank realm of paper and pencil

Blank ream of paper and pencil

Roslyn Rose

Rochester Artisans 10 Questions Interview

1. What is your name and what is your business name? Where can we find you through social media?

I am Roslyn Rose and my business is called Roslyn Rose Studios. I am a new artist in Rochester and I so happy toPenguins have found such a welcoming art community.

I can be contacted at the following email addresses and social medias.
roslynrosestudio@gmail.com or rrose@roslynrose.com

My blog.
My personal Facebook page.
My Facebook business page.
My LinkedIn account.

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I was told I was an ‘artist’ in the second grade. From that day forward, I considered myself an ‘artist.

3. Explain a bit about your process, please.

I digitally blend multiple photographs to create images that may suggest the past, the future or a new reality. I juxtapose the neglected with the occupied, the deserted with the inhabited, one place with another, or the past with the present.

untitled

4. What’s the comment heard most about your art?
Many people look at my finished prints and ask, “How did ever you do that?”

5. What is one thing people find surprising about how your art is created?
Viewers of my artwork are always surprised how the collaging of different images become so integrated.

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?

As my work is so technically involved, I cannot live without my cameras, computer, scanner, and printers.

7. How has your art changed over time?
I originally was a painter but then became addicted to printmaking, especially etching. Later I started to combine photography with my prints. The development of Photoshop drew me to concentrate on photography and image manipulation.

8. What’s your favorite part about making your pieces? Least favorite?
I love the possibilities available to me by combining different photographs to produce montages that ask to the viewer to blend their own imagination with the illusions I present. I enjoy everything about the technique I use to produce my prints.

9. What’s your dream project?
My dream project at the moment is to have an exhibit in Rochester.

New Studio
10. Where is your art available for purchase?
My art is available for purchase at my studio in the Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman Street, #402. The studio is open to the public on most First Fridays and by appointment.

I am represented in New York City by the Ceres Gallery, 547 West 27th Street, #201. I also ship work to buyers who contact me thru my website.

Amanda Preske, Circuit Breaker Labs

R o c h e s t e r A r t i s a n s
Artist Interview: 10 Questions

1. What is your name and what is your business name? Where can we find you online?

I am Amanda Preske, owner of Circuit Breaker Labs.
CircuitBreakerLabs.com
CircuitBreakerLabs.Etsy.com
Instagram.com/circuitbreakerlabs
https://www.facebook.com/LimeMade/

rings-2

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?

I remember in kindergarten when we were asked to write down our dream job, and I wrote artist. I’ve always had my hands busy in some sort of creative endeavor. Years later and a PhD in chemistry, I realized I needed to do what I was most happy doing, so I left chemistry and transitioned to being a full time artist (kindergarten me knew best). I started selling jewelry when I was 14 and called the business Beadwork by Amanda. About 9 years ago, my brother was attempting to repair the family computer. He was unable to diagnose and fix the problem, but I was transfixed by the beauty and complexity of circuit boards, so I made a few jewelry pieces with them. Years later, many refinements, and some serious business changes, Circuit Breaker Labs emerged.

3. Explain a bit about your process, please.

I start with recycled circuit boards, with most of them coming from computers, calculators, telephones, cell phones, and other small electronics. I’ve been collecting them for nearly a decade, so I’ve amassed a really neat collection of colors encompassing the entire rainbow, plus gorgeous shades of turquoise, lime green, mint, and lavender. With a range of tools, I remove bulky items like heat sinks, PCI and memory slots, peripheral connectors, and extraneous wires. Then I cut and shape the board to fit the piece, clean off dust and trim the edges, then set them in bezels. It is a VERY messy process, so I use a dusk mask, goggles, face shield, gloves, dedicated clothes, and ventilation to protect myself. I use an epoxy resin to seal everything because it completely encapsulates the circuit board (no chance of a hazardous exposure) and it creates a neat lensing effect that magnifies the resin to create a really nice, polished look.

copper circle neckllaces

4. What’s the comment heard most about your art?

“What a neat idea,” and “Is that the real color?” are the most common comments. Most people have only seen green circuit boards, so seeing them in this context with a rainbow of colors often stops shoppers in their tracks to take a closer look.

5. What is one thing people find surprising about how your art is created?

A lot of people think I use glass to cover the circuit board and don’t know about the versatility of resin. I take great care to produce bubble-free resin, so it is mistaken for glass at times.

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?

Quite literally, I couldn’t produce my art without wire cutters, but the workhorse in my process is my Dremel tool. From cutting to grinding, it does a lot of the heavy lifting, which is a life saver because circuit board is such a tough material to work with.

CBL preske studio photo

7. How has your art changed over time?

I originally started by casting circuit board pieces with resin in a mold. Those first pieces were clunky and very simple. I still stick to a simple, contemporary aesthetic, but it’s much more refined. Recently, I’ve been playing with creating my own settings so that I can have a lot more design flexibility and produce one of a kind works.

8. What’s your favorite part about making your pieces? Least favorite?

I love picking out the circuit board. There are so many colors, designs, components, and patterns to look at. And as computing technologies have evolved, the components have gotten smaller, more intricate, and more interesting. My least favorite process is dealing with bubbles and dust that develop as the resin cures. When I check on a batch about 16 hours later, there are inevitably a few pieces that come out wonky and fixing them is tedious.

9. What’s your dream project?

I’d love to make a ridiculous collar piece- something large, detailed, and full of character. Most of what I make is production work, so venturing out into a “museum piece” would really test my skill and creativity.

10. Where is your art available for purchase?

Locally, my work is at the MAG and Little Button Craft & Press. I also exhibit at Clothesline Festival and Mayday! Underground. Online, you can find my work on my website and through Etsy and Amazon Handmade. I’m pretty stoked that my work is at a couple of really awesome science museums across the country, including the Exploratorium in San Francisco.

green ring earrings

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Artists at Work on 1st Saturdays

Artist at work schedule 2015-2016

Art House Press

Art House Press

Art House Press is a local, online magazine, just a couple of months old. If you ever needed further proof that Rochester loves art, check out the RocMaps page of studios and galleries.

You’ll no doubt see a few familiar names of artists profiled in the December and January articles, produced by founder Cordell Cordaro and his team of 8.

Arts in Focus: JackBear Stamps

AIFsiteLogo_0

I learned of Arts InFocus a couple of weeks ago.

Arts InFocus is a collaboration with more than 30 PBS stations across the country – sharing content with each other to spotlight the amazing arts and cultural scenes of communities nationwide. The series airs Fridays at 8:30pm on WXXI-TV and on select PBS stations across the country, and serves as a perfect lead-in to Friday night’s PBS Arts block. PBS Arts programming presents a series of programs that highlight music, theater, performers and artists. Arts InFocus repeats Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. on WXXI-TV and is available on demand on this web site.

John Ballou, however, I met a few years ago. We were both set up to sell at Spot Coffee on a Sunday afternoon, I think it was. I was somewhat new to shows and was offered this $10 opportunity by Vickie Porter, I think it was. My memory is fuzzy but I think maybe Jen Born was there too. There were only about a half dozen of us. I was happy to meet some new friends – and unhappy to not meet a single customer.

Two Little Boys Stamp

I watched John carve stamps that afternoon, mesmerized. I honestly didn’t know a human could carve such tiny, intricate detail by hand. And when I look at his work now, I’m even more blown away. Pop over to his blog and read some behind the scenes stuff, then watch his appearance on Arts InFocus.

Iron Roots Clothing

Local Artist Overcoming Disability with a Generous Spirit

Blue Apatite Jasper on Silver Plated Brass

Karen Holtz, a local artist at Soulstice Artisan Market will be featured with her husband Bob at Soulstice Artisan Market, 632 North Winton Rd, February 6th from 6-8 pm.

Karen has a chronic disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) This is a severe form of neuromuscular disease. This disability has not stopped her though. Through the use of various mobility aids she has overcome her disability and is creating beautiful pieces of unique art, concentrating mostly on jewelry. When I first met Karen she explained to me that she started to create beautiful jewelry so she can see her work worn and it makes her feel beautiful again. Karen does not need anything to make her beautiful! Her warm glow, strength and beautiful soul, that she portrays in her creations shows her inner beauty, the true form of beauty. Visit Soulstice Artisan Market on February 6th, another “First Friday” event in Rochester, to meet Karen and be inspired. For more information, please call the store at 585-370-0076.

2013 Spencerport Canal Days, Bob Holtz, Karen Holtz with festival organizer Wendy Dandria.

2013 Spencerport Canal Days, Bob Holtz, Karen Holtz with festival organizer Wendy Dandria.

Holtz Collage

I Heart Charlotte

Booth
I love Charlotte Reid Besaw! Meet her one time and she makes you feel like you’ve been best buds forever. She’s fun, super creative and talented as you can see from her HandCandy Mittens website. She turned me on to the Beekman Boys. I love her liberal politics. She posts cool stuff on her Facebook page. If I tell you that she’s a hoot and a half, you’ll believe me after you see that her profile pic is a little boy pissing on GMO villan Monsanto. See what I mean?

Scarves

Anyway, I love what she wrote on Network! this morning in response to this common question in the professional art/craft world, “How long have you been doing it full-time and what did it take for you to get there?”

I have done this full-time since 2006. My hubby came on board (that is, he now works with me) in 2010. He has a part-time job with our village, but it only amounts to 3-4 hours a day at best. He gives me a couple of hours cutting and sewing linings for me, and is my sherpa for shows, serving as chauffeur, waiter, laborer, and best buddy. I also have a lady who does hand finishing for me, and hire a cutter when I can afford it. We have wholesale accounts in around 40 stores, so that extends our season with shows. We live a very simple life. Our vehicles are not brand new, and we paid cash for them… they are not pretty, but they get us from point A to B and provide sleeping quarters on the road. We don’t have credit cards, we love to cook our own meals on the road, we have a garden and can our veggies, we are junkers. We have the best life that we could imagine, and could not be happier since we left the world of retail and restaurants( for me) and construction(, for him). Yes, the hours are long, the bookkeeping and paperwork suck, but I would not go back to the alternative. I work all the time, but I am a maker. It is what I do. Without a creative outlet (Colleen :)) I would lose my mind. I must sew. And God bless me, I can make enough money to pay my bills, fill our bellies, and be happy. Our shows are like little vacations, especially in the summer. We have canoes, and love to strap one to the top of the vehicle…great way to wind down on a Saturday night.

Surrounded by Mittens

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