Creative Entrepreneurship

Posts tagged ‘Get to Know’

Get to Know . . . Chris Charles

1atWork_FlyRabbitPress

Hello! I’m Chris Charles, and I own Fly Rabbit Press. My business Facebook page is here.

How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?

I’ve been an artist my whole life – in high school I used to waive lunch so I could take an extra art class! After high school I attended Montserrat College of Art (Beverly, MA) and received a BFA in painting. Then, while living in Southern California, I went back to school for graphic design, which I still do today. About 4 years ago I stumbled on letterpress printing. After taking a couple of classes I became a renter at the Genesee Center for Arts Education. This is still where I do most of my printing.

GeneseeCenterBuilding

Explain a little bit about your process.

I use a combination of hand-set type, linoleum carving and photopolymer (custom plates made from computer files). Setting type involves putting together letters made of metal or wood, one letter at a time. Everything needs to be properly spaced and blocked out, then locked up in the press. I would say about 80% of each project is sketching/design and set-up, the other 20% actual printing on the press.

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What’s the comment heard most often about your art?

Many people say they like how it has a vintage look. I also get laughs from a few of my cards.

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What is one thing people find surprising in how your art is created?

I don’t think letterpress is a printing technique many people are familiar with, so often my prints are confused for silk-screens or even digital prints! Once I explain the process, people are surprised by the technique, and how time-consuming it is.

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What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?

Paper!

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How has your art changed over time?

I feel like I have more tricks up my sleeve these days – different techniques I’ve learned or experimented with over the past several years–which creates more possibilities. My carving skills have improved as well, so overall I’ve become more adventurous with my art.

4FRP_Yeti

What’s your favorite part of making your pieces? Least favorite?

My favorite part– the first time I pull a print, and get to see ink on paper.

Least favorite– when things go wrong on the press and I can’t figure out why. Usually many tears are involved.

What’s your dream project?

A poster series for a musician or festival (listen up Jazz Fest!), of course with no limit on materials/colors I can use, and an endless budget 🙂

Where is your art available for purchase?

Etsy
Dunham Enfield Gallery
Pistachio Press, 250 Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607
Western NY Book Arts Center in Buffalo, N Y (in the gift shop)

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Get to Know . . . Pam Perkins

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What is your name and what is your business name?
My name is Pam Perkins and my company’s name is Small Town Girl. You can find me on Pinterest, my website and my Etsy shop

How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I have been making jewelry for 4 years. What got me started was I bought a beautiful necklace that didn’t have matching earrings so I made a pair myself. They were a great match, and that gave me the initiative to create earrings. And now I have added stick pins and pins of my own design.

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Explain a little bit about your process.
I love to use different colored wire that compliments the color of the stones. I find that many people like the wire “swirl” design on the earrings.

What’s the comment heard most often about your art?
My customers have commented how they love the use of color wire that gives the earrings the additional pizzazz.

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What is one thing people find surprising in how your art is created?
I use the wire as one whole piece called “fish hook” and its simple design works for people with dexterity issues.

What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art? The Wigjig, so I can make the “swirl.”

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How has your art changed over time?
I’ve added pins especially stick pins as another option. And I’m using larger stones to make pendants.

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What’s your favorite part of making your pieces? Least favorite?
My favorite part is finding stones that look fantastic together and then finding the right color wire that makes the combination complete. Least favorite is ordering stones and finding their color is not what I expected.

What’s your dream project?
To work with copper, using copper to solder, bend and hammer.

Where is your art available for purchase?
I do art shows throughout the year, in addition to Pinterest, my website and my Etsy shop.

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Pam is too modest to mention her 15 minutes of fame. She has nimble fingers – it says so right here! There’s a nice photo op too. Congratulations, Pam!

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Get to Know . . . Diane Fleckenstein

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What is your name and what is your business name?
My name is Diane Fleckenstein, the name of my business is Crafters Haven and my website is Create with Felt.

How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I have been crafting since I was a teen. I use to make my own clothes, but over the years I have widened my crafting experience. I always like to learn something new. There isn’t anything I haven’t tried. I love making things for family and friends for gifts.

Explain a little bit about your process.
Today my creativity has brought me to another level – needle felting with wool, yarns and all kinds of fiber, either by knitting with wool then felting it, or creating my own fabric with wool rovings and wet felting it into a one of a kind piece of art.

I also love to upcycle wool sweaters into a one-of-a-kind bag or pillow.

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What’s the comment heard most often about your art?
How talented and creative I am.

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What is one thing people find surprising in how your art is created?
Some people do not even know what needle felting is. I explain to them the process of using wool rovings, yarns and fibers to create my art with barb needles or a felting machine.

What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
Wool, yarns, barb needles and a felting machine.

How has your art changed over time?
I don’t think it has changed, but there is a lot of information out there on how to create fantastic art with needle felting.

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What’s your favorite part of making your pieces? Least favorite?
I think my favorite part is laying out my wool rovings and adding yarns and embellishments to my creations. It just brings it to a whole other level.

My least favorite is trying to decide what to make next, too many ideas in my head.

What’s your dream project?
Creating a picture art with wool with embellishments, beads and hand embroidery.

Where is your art available for purchase?
My pieces are available on my web site: Create with Felt and on Etsy at DeesTees.

I also will be doing some local shows in 2013.

Get to Know . . . Steve Duprey

Steve Duprey

1. What is your name and what is your business name?
My name is Steve Duprey. I’m a painter and I run dupreyart.com.

2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
I’m entering my third year as a visual artist (painter) but I’ve been a Musician and Theatre Director for about forty years. The impetus to start painting actually came from my wife. I’d been making noise about picking up a paint brush and painting for about 25 years. Three Christmases ago my wife had had enough of the talk and went out and bought me all the supplies I needed to really get started. On Christmas morning I heard those sweet wonderful words, “There! Now shut up and paint.” I dove in and haven’t looked back. I was surprised at how easily it came and I have enjoyed every minute.

3. Explain a little bit about your process.
I paint mostly landscapes in acrylic. These are near and dear to me because I love nature. I paint, for the most part, in my studio (a spare upstairs bedroom in our home). Each time I paint, I set up the video camera and record the process. Most of my paintings take between an hour and three hours to create. Then I edit the video down to about five or six minutes (speeded up so you can see the whole process) and send it to a composer friend in Texas. He views the video and composes original music for it. Once I get the music back from him, I post the video on my YouTube page. My YouTube channel is listed as sdupe7.

As to the process of creating the paintings, it’s been, for me, more about learning the techniques and then combining them in different ways. I love putting colors in the skies that don’t belong there! I also love creating a painting that draws people in and makes them wonder what’s beyond the painting. I get that comment a lot!

Winter Mist 2

Winter Mist 2

4. What’s the comment heard most often about your art?
I’ve done the show circuit a bit (Clothesline Arts Festival, Letchworth, Canandaigua Lakeshore) and in just a year have earned the reputation as “The Tree Guy”. I do love painting trees and I believe that each time I do, they get more and more realistic. I often hear the comment “it looks like a photo”. I love to hear that!

Sepia Lake

Sepia Lake

5. What is one thing people find surprising in how your art is created?
Most people are surprised with two things: How short a time I have been painting and how little time it takes me to create the painting itself. There is an assumption that it takes days or weeks to create a painting. I sometimes get the comment that I should be on Public Television painting (the way one of my mentors Bob Ross did). I always take that as a wonderful compliment although I do very few paintings in the 25 minutes that he could. As to the short time I’ve been painting, I usually tell people that I have been painting in my head for 25 or 30 years and I finally let it out.

6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
I love my fan brush and my big fat two inch brush. I use them in virtually every painting I do. Beyond that, I couldn’t really do what I do without the technology to do it. So my computer and my video camera are essential parts of getting my work out there, and I believe that that is the hardest part of being an artist these days.

7. How has your art changed over time?
It hasn’t had much time to change since I have been at it for only a couple years. The subject matter has remained essentially the same. But when I look back at the earlier pieces that I have done I can certainly see vast improvement in the quality of the work and the confidence with which I approach a blank canvas.

8. What’s your favorite part of making your pieces? Least favorite?
I love getting an idea, seeing it in my mind’s eye, and then comparing that to the final product. There’s something about being in the moment of painting when you feel a little like the “master of all you survey”. If you want a tree, you make a tree. You want a mountain? Poof! There’s a mountain! I love moving tree branches to different layers of the painting…there’s so much power in it!

Despair in the Green

Despair in the Green

My least favorite part of painting is trying to find the exact moment when the painting is “Done”. I had a lot of trouble with that early on and would “overwork” things until they became too muddy. I’m getting much better at finding that moment, but it’s always a struggle.

9. What’s your dream project?
I love creating series works. I guess my real “Dream” would be to have a client who asked me to create a series for every room in the house. It’s frustrating to create and create and then have the work pile up in the studio. I’d love to be able to paint knowing that each piece was headed for a home.

10. Where is your art available for purchase?
All of my work can be seen and purchased at www.dupreyart.com. I also do local shows but I’m finding it difficult to find my niche. You know, that place where I know I’m always going to make more money than I spent to be there.

Beginning in April I will have a three month exhibit of my work at the Finger Lakes Credit Union in Geneva, NY. I’m very excited about that!

Get to Know . . . Linda Bowers

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1. My name is Linda Bowers and my business is Just Eggsquisite. I specialize in creating Ukrainian eggs (pysanky), jewel boxes and kaleidoscopes. The eggshell is my canvas, working on eggs ranging in size from quail to ostrich. Check out my Facebook page.

2. I started decorating eggs when I took a Ukrainian Egg decorating class at the Rochester Museum and Science Center back in the early 1990’s. I became an official business is 1995 when I began to sell my decorated eggs at local craft shows. In 2000 I decided to homeschool my three daughters and had to put my egg decorating business away. My youngest daughter has since graduated, and I have started up my business again in 2012!!

Ostrich Egg

Ostrich Egg

3. Ukrainian egg decorating employs a batik, or wax resist, method. I apply wax to a white eggshell. The area under the wax will remain white when I dip the egg in the next color dye — yellow. I will write on the egg with wax again and whatever is under the wax will now remain yellow. These steps are continued until my design is complete. The wax is then removed and the egg is varnished.

4. The comments I hear most often about my work: “These are real eggs?” “You want HOW MUCH for an egg?” “You don’t charge enough for your work.”

Quail Egg

Quail Egg

5. People are surprised when I tell them my products are real eggs. They also are surprised to learn that my eggs are dyed, not painted.

6. I could not live without my electric kistka for creating my art. A kistka is the tool that I use to apply the melted wax to an egg. It allows me to write on the egg.

7. My art has changed over time in two areas: tools and designs.

Tools: Original kistkas were wooden sticks with brass funnels wired to one end. The kistka was heated in the flame of a candle to warm the funnel and melt the wax. An artist would need to continually move the kistka from flame to eggshell to keep the wax at a constant temperature. Now there are electric kistkas available. You just plug them in and the wax is kept at a constant temperature in the brass funnel. Many egg artists still use conventional kistkas. There are egg lathes available now to get more accurate measurements on your egg as opposed to marking them by hand.

Artist at Work

Design: Ukrainian eggs have employed traditional symbols and colors for thousands of years. Pysanky created today do not necessarily employ these traditional colors or symbols. Designs found on pysanky today are as original and contemporary as the minds of the artists themselves.

Sunflower

8. My favorite part of creating pysanky is there is an limitless supply of designs and colors. There is always a new challenge around the corner. My least favorite part of Ukrainian egg decorating is emptying out all those eggshells!!

9. My dream project would be to create a jewel box out of an ostrich shell.

10. My art is available in my Etsy shop. I will also be participating in several local arts and crafts shows in the Rochester area for 2013.

Get to Know: Artist Interview

I would love to feature members of Rochester Artisans in our Get to Know section of this blog.

Kindly take a moment to reflect on these 10 questions. Please provide answers in as few or many words as you’d like. Send your answers to me via email, along with at least two photos of your art and one of you and/or your studio. Or – create a video of you answering the questions!

  1. What is your name and what is your business name? (Provide as many links as you’d like.)
  2. How long have you been an artist and how did you get started?
  3. Explain a little bit about your process.
  4. What’s the comment heard most often about your art?
  5. What is one thing people find surprising in how your art is created?
  6. What’s the one tool you couldn’t live without, in creating your art?
  7. How has your art changed over time?
  8. What’s your favorite part of making your pieces? Least favorite?
  9. What’s your dream project?
  10. Where is your art available for purchase?

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