Creative Entrepreneurship

Posts tagged ‘Patty Zachman’

Extraordinary Enamels: May 7 – June 5

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Glass on Metal – Extraordinary Enamels by Jackie Bailey, Leslie Bowers, Len (Lenaria) Brondum, Yvonne Cupolo, A. R. Magaletta McClure, Dan McClure and Patricia Zachman.

(I’m happy to say the McClures and Patty Zachman are Rochester Artisan members!)

May 7 through June 5, 2015.

Wayne County Council for the Arts
108 W. Miller Street
Newark, NY

An opening reception, which is free to the public, with the artists will be held Saturday, May 9 from 4:00 to 6:00 pm.

Wayne Art Gallery hours are Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 12:00 to 3:00 pm and by appointment.

For more information, call (315) 331-4593, email us at info@wayne-arts.com or check out our website.

Jackie Bailey: Enameling has been a passion since living in Cleveland, Ohio, a center for the art of enameling. Jackie majored in art at Rochester Institute of Technology and has exhibited widely. He also displayed work on the internet and was employed as a decorator consultant for many years. Jackie also had a painting done in acrylics published in a book.

Leslie Bowers: Leslie lives with her family in Phelps, NY. After retiring from the Rochester School for the Deaf in 2003, she pursued her desire to design, hand craft and sell jewelry. Although she had become a silver smith years before, she decided to include some kind of art in her designs. Having become fascinated with enamels she had seen in Williamstown, MA, Leslie decided to learn this technique. She took classes in enameling at the Memorial Art Gallery, studying with Yvonne Cupolo. After learning what she could do, Leslie produced a number of enamels, which she sold at area shows such as the Clothesline and Arts in the Gardens at Sonnenberg. In addition to jewelry making, she is also working on her painting skills and has
show in several area galleries.

Len (Lenaria) Brondum: Len is best known for her vibrant silk canvases which have been published in various books and magazines. After achieving Master Silk Painter status , she resumed her interest in enameling. Her enamels were displayed in Newark, New Jersey museum as well as the Glass on Metal Conference in Cape Cod. She was featured on the Grains of Glass website for a month and will be featured in the Glass on Metal magazine this summer.

Yvonne Cupolo: Yvonne has been creating cloisonné and sterling silver jewelry for 35 years. With a BFA degree from Rochester Institute of Technology and MFA from SUNY Brockport, she has taught metalsmithing and enameling at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester NY and The Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY. Her work is colorful and whimsical, a kind of magic realism, celebrating natural subjects. The cloisonné jewelry in this exhibit features images of cats, flowers, and designs set in sterling silver and accented with gemstones. Yvonne Cupolo’s jewelry has been published and exhibited nationally, and is in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass, and The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog.

Antoinette M. McClure and Dan McClure: Both Antoinette and Dan retired from teaching after sixty collective years in public schools. During her teaching tenure Antoinette owned and operated a small jewelry store with her husband and artistic collaborator, Dan McClure. Dan introduced enameling to Antoinette and they both started to cast jewelry using the lost wax method. As the years have progressed they have combined their work as artists and are now with the ARTISANworks in Rochester, NY. All their work combines three elements: wood, glass and metal. In 2009, Rainmaker Designs (name of their business) received the ‘hottest new product’ award from The Rochester Home and Garden Show in Rochester, NY.

Lacey Cloisonne
Patricia Zachman: Although Patricia has had a life long love of enamel art, especially cloisonné, she has been working in the medium for only a couple of years. Her latest cloisonné pieces reflect her study of calligraphy and Celtic and Medieval manuscripts. Patty currently lives and works in Webster, NY with her husband, Tom (who works in fused and stained glass), and their Australian Shepherd, Lacey. She feels fortunate to be learning the art of cloisonné from enamelist Yvonne Cupolo.

FirePaint Studio, Saturday Guest Artist at Hungerford 318

Patty Zachman Collage

Each piece I make has many layers of enamel and color. I start with a piece of copper which I hand saw, drill, file, sand and thoroughly scrub clean of all dirt and oil.

Then I sift a layer of powdered enamel onto copper, fire it in a kiln at 1200-1500 degrees F. I let it cool and scrub it again. This process is repeated over and over for every layer of enamel. Some pieces go through 7 firings. Both sides of the copper are enameled to give the piece stability and allow the wearer to show either side.

I’m so happy to be invited to be a guest artist this Second Saturday at The Hungerford! I’ll be selling my enameled copper jewelry at Hungerford 318, a colorful little shop owned by my husband and 4 other artists. I hope you’ll stop by! ~ Patty Zachman ~

August 9
10:00 – 3:00
Second Saturday at The Hungerford

1115 East Main Street
Rochester, NY

Fire Paint Studio Guest Artist at Hungerford 318
JK Stitches (Suite 318)
L Prince Designs Art Jewelry (Suite 318)
Mary Terziani Glass1st Place in Glass, 2013 Brockport Arts Festival (Suite 318)
Pine Tree Designs 2013 Honorable Mention at Artist Row (Suite 318)
Tom Zachman Fused Glass (Suite 318)

Patty Zachman, Enamelist

Patty's Process

I met Patty Zachman through her husband, Tom, who was one of the very early joiners of Rochester Artisans. He’s a glass artist, now working with fused glass and has also worked with stained glass. Patty is a calligrapher and she loves paper. A lot. Especially delicate handmade paper with inclusions.

She still works on her calligraphy, but a couple of years ago Patty started working with powdered enamel and copper, turning it into lovely jewelry. I was at Tom & Patty’s house over the summer and asked for a tour of their studios, aka, the basement. Panic ensued but they led me downstairs, showed me lots of stuff and answered skillions of questions. I love studio tours – seeing how other artists live!

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It was then that I learned what a labor intensive process it is to enamel copper. Each layer is it’s own little project – and Patty is as meticulous as they come!

When I asked her to join the artists selling their works at the Fairport Pharmacy gift shop, I noticed she wrote a nice little bit about her process when submitting the paperwork to me. I’ve posted it on our Facebook page and today decided to share it with customers in the store looking at her work. So I made a sign and placed it near her jewelry, as you can see in the top photo. People like to buy from people they know and like. To know Patty is to like her.

Each piece I make has many layers of enamel and color. I start with a piece of copper which I hand saw, drill, file, sand and thoroughly scrub clean of all dirt and oil.

Then I sift a layer of enamel onto the copper, fire it in a kiln at 1200-1500 degrees F. I let it cool and scrub it again. This process is repeated for every layer of enamel. Both sides of the copper are enameled to give the piece stability and allow the wearer to show either side.

Bracelets

Patty is very shy and I’m pretty sure she’s going to kill me when reads that I wrote an entire blog post about her. But I really want to encourage you to see her work in person in the gift shop at Fairport Pharmacy. She doesn’t do shows so this (plus one other store) are the only places to see her work. I would say all of her jewelry can be worn by men and women. The enameled copper pieces are clean, simple shapes and the depth of color is anything but simple.

The name of her business is FirePaint Studio (I confess, I’m not positive if that should be 2 words or 3!) I hope you enjoy her work.

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